TRAVEL SAFETY!!!!​

ACCIDENTS HAPPEN, RIGHT?  RECENTLY ONE OF OUR FAMILIES SUFFERED A TRAGIC ACCIDENT, THANKFULLY THEY WILL RECOVER, BOTH WERE AIRLIFTED TO TWO SEPARATE TRAUMA CENTERS IN MIAMI.  THE COLLISION WAS WITH A MULTI-TON GRAVEL TRUCK THAT CAME DOWN THE HIGHWAY IN THE WRONG LANE.  EMERGENCY RESPONSE WAS QUICK AND EFFICIENT, THEIR TWO CAVALIERS WERE IN THE VEHICLE WITH THEM.  HARVEY WAS IN THE BACK SEAT, NOT SECURED.  IRMA WAS IN THE FRONT SEAT ON MOM'S LAP, ALSO UNSECURED.  UPON IMPACT EVERYONE WAS THROWN AROUND, FORTUNATELY FOR IRMA, THE AIRBAG DID NOT DEPLOY, SHE WOULD HAVE CERTAINLY BEEN KILLED INSTANTLY.  HARVEY IN THE BACK SEAT, BOUNCED AROUND LIKE A RACQUET BALL, MIRACULOUSLY, NEITHER CAVALIER SUFFERED MORE THAN BRUISES AND SHEER TERROR.  CAN YOU JUST IMAGINE?  HERE'S WHERE IT GOT TO BE TRULY FRIGHTENING.  MOM AND DAD WERE AIRLIFTED TO TRAUMA CENTERS,  AND FORTUNATELY THE HARVEY AND IRMA WERE CARED FOR BY THE ATTENDING DOCTORS AND NURSES FOR TWO DAYS.   THE TWO CAVALIERS WERE SUBSEQUENTLY RELEASED TO AN UNSCRUPULOUS 'PET RESCUE' ORGANIZATION RUN BY A SINGLE PERSON.  MIND YOU, THE MOM AND DAD ARE IN THE HOSPITAL, THEY DON'T KNOW WHERE THEIR CAVALIERS ARE, AND WHEN THEY FIND OUT WHERE HARVEY AND IRMAARE, THEY'RE YELLED AT AND NOT COOPERATED WITH BY THIS SO CALLED ORGANIZATION.  HELPLESS TO DO ANYTHING, WE WERE CALLED AND AFTER EMPLOYING THE HELP OF THE FAMILY'S ATTORNEY, SHE AGREED TO RELEASE THE CAVALIERS TO US.  THEY WERE FILTHY, SMELLED HORRIBLE, BUT UNHARMED, HARVEY WAS MALNOURISHED AS HE WAS BEING FED SOME GENERIC FOOD, THEY WERE TRAUMATIZED THEMSELVES, AND OF COURSE, THEY DIDN'T KNOW WHERE THEY WERE.  

POINT IS THIS.  IF YOU'RE GOING TO HAVE YOUR BELOVED CAVALIERS IN THE CAR WITH YOU, SECURE THEM TO THE SEATBELT THROUGH THEIR COLLARS, SO SHOULD AN ACCIDENT HAPPEN, THEY'LL BE HELD IN PLACE, YOU'D DO THIS FOR YOUR CHILDREN WOULDN'T YOU?  

MAKE CERTAIN YOU HAVE INSTRUCTIONS IN PLACE, PERHAPS ENGRAVED ON THEIR TAG ON THEIR COLLAR, WHO TO CALL, WHERE THEY ARE TO GO, YOU GET THE PICTURE.  

PARAMEDICS FIRST AND FOREMOST RESPONSIBILITY IS TO THE INJURED PEOPLE, AND LASTLY ANY PETS THAT MAY BE INVOLVED, OFTEN TURNED OVER TO ANIMAL CONTROL, LOST, SCARED AND POSSIBLY EUTHANIZED DUE TO LACK OF ABILITY TO CONTACT SOMEONE.  

SECURE YOUR PETS, JUST AS YOU WOULD YOUR CHILDREN.  THEY CAN'T FEND FOR THEMSELVES.  THEY CAN'T TALK, AND THEY DON'T KNOW WHERE TO GO FOR HELP.  ESPECIALLY ON A BUSY INTERSTATE WHERE THIS ACCIDENT OCCURED.  

TRAVELING IS GOOD FOR THEM, TREAT THEM LIKE YOUR CHILD.  THIS PARTICULAR SITUATION CAME WITH A HAPPY ENDING, THE FAMILY IS BEING CARED FOR IN HOSPITALS, THE TWO CAVALIERS ARE BEING CARED FOR IN FAMILIAR SURROUNDINGS.  DO THIS FOR YOUR CAVALIERS, AFTER ALL THEY ARE YOUR FAMILY.   ACCIDENTS CAN AND WILL HAPPEN, SIMPLE AS THAT.

Teach your puppy to ride in a car

 

 

Riding safely in a car can be a great way, not only for you and your dog to get from Point A to Point B, but to bond and partake in fun adventures together. Let’s talk about safe ways to teach your puppy to ride in a car.

Teaching Your Puppy To Ride In A Car

Safety first. Do not let your dog ride on your lap while you’re driving. If there is an accident, you will not be able to hold onto your dog. And keep your pet away from the airbags. This will likely mean not letting your dog ride on your lap in the front seat. When an airbag deploys many people get injured and that is the same for your dog.

Decide how you want your dog or puppy to travel with you: in a crate, carrier, or in a safety harness or dog-specific seatbelt. Whatever type of restraint you choose, your pup will need to become familiar with it. Let him investigate it in his own time—don’t rush the process. You don’t want to inadvertently cause him to become fearful of the safety devices.

Start car rides when your dog is a puppy. The sooner you get your puppy accustomed to the car and to riding in it, the better chance you have of your puppy finding it an enjoyable adventure. To begin this process, let puppy explore it while it’s sitting in the driveway. Let puppy sit in the seats, explore the floors, see what the carpet in the hatchback feels like before turning on the car.

Tips: Bring a favorite toy or blanket in the car with you so your dog feels safe and comfortable. Give your puppy a special treat, toy or dog bone that puppy only gets in the car.

Once your puppy has played around inside it a bit, close the doors, turn the radio on a low volume and turn on the vehicle. Let puppy experience what it feels like when the engine is running. If puppy seems okay with that, move back and forth in the driveway to acquaint puppy with the movement of the car before you take a practice trip.

Take frequent trips. If the only trip your dog takes in the vehicle is to the veterinarian’s office, they may equate “car ride” with “scary, loud, other-dog-smelly place” and become nervous.

Get in the habit of taking your dog for a car ride weekly, if possible. Take a quick drive to  a different part of town, where you can explore and take a walk. Take your puppy with you when you go visit friends and family (with ample warning ahead of time). If you don’t have a set location in mind, simply take a drive around the block or go see the sights!

Important Pet Safety Reminders

Make sure your puppy is microchipped and/or wearing a collar. If there is an accident or if you open the door and your puppy somehow escapes from his/her harness and dashes off into unfamiliar terrain, you will want to make certain they are microchipped to help you get them back. If your puppy isn’t microchipped they needs to wear a collar and tags with your contact information.

Carry your pet’s vet records with you. If you’re traveling and are away from your usual veterinarian and your pet needs medical attention you need to have access to his vet records. Ask your vet for a copy of all of your pet’s medical records and keep them with you – in your vehicle or attached to the puppy's crate or carrier. When you’re mapping out your route, make certain you know where the local veterinarian’s offices are in the event of an emergency.

Bring food and water. Traveling can be stressful for your pet no matter how much he likes riding in a car. To alleviate any potential for tummy issues when you arrive at your destination, plan ahead: Pack enough food and water from home. (Even a change in their drinking water can lead to stomach upset.) Don’t forget to bring collapsible bowls! You may not be able to pack enough water for your entire trip, but ease your pets into drinking the water at the new place. Offer him frequent water and potty breaks. Avoid feeding them during the trip, if possible, especially if they’re prone to car sickness.

Prevent sunburn. Just as humans can suffer sunburn while driving in a car, so too, can your pets. Shade your puppy from the rays of the sun as much as possible. Keep the vehicle cool enough, so your puppy doesn’t get overheated. If they’re going to be in the sun, you may want to put sunblock on their skin so they don’t get a sunburn, this is especially necessary for short-haired and white dogs (and cats).

Never leave your puppy alone in the car. In many states, it is illegal to leave a pet alone in a vehicle. In the summer, it can quickly heat up to dangerous levels. Within a matter of minutes, the temperature inside the car can reach levels that are dangerous or even fatal for pets. In the winter, leaving a puppy alone in the car can lead to hypothermia. A puppy left alone in the car could be stolen.

Bottom Line On Driving With Your Dog

Since so many of us consider our pets to be members of the family, we want to include them in our plans—whether it’s a vacation or a trip to the park with the children. With planning, training, and patience, you and your dogs can enjoy road trips cross-country or just across town!

 TRAVEL

 

Plan in Advance

Make sure you know how to get to your 24/7 emergency veterinary clinic before there’s an emergency. Talk with your veterinarian in advance to find out where you would need to take your pet, and plan your travel route so you’re not trying to find your way when stressed. Always keep these numbers posted in an easy-to-find location in case of emergencies:

  • Your veterinarian’s clinic phone number
  • 24/7 emergency veterinary clinic (if different)
  • ASPCA Poison Control Hotline: 1-888-426-4435 (A fee may apply.)

Food

Keep people food away from pets. If you want to share  treats with your pets, make or buy treats formulated just for them. The following people foods are especially hazardous for pets:

  • Chocolate is an essential part of the holidays for many people, but it is toxic to dogs and cats. Although the toxicity can vary based on the type of chocolate, the size of your pet, and the amount they ate, it’s safer to consider all chocolate off limits for pets.
  • Other sweets and baked goods also should be kept out of reach. Not only are they often too rich for pets; an artificial sweetener often found in baked goods, candy and chewing gum, xylitol, has been linked to liver failure and death in dogs.
  • Turkey and turkey skin – sometimes even in small amounts – can cause a life-threatening condition in pets known as pancreatitis.
  • Table scraps – including gravy and meat fat –also should be kept away from pets. Many foods that are healthy for people are poisonous to pets, including onions, raisins and grapes. During the holidays, when our own diets tend toward extra-rich foods, table scraps can be especially fattening and hard for animals to digest and can cause pancreatitis.
  • Yeast dough can cause problems for pets, including painful gas and potentially dangerous bloating.
Quick action can save lives. If you believe your pet has been poisoned or eaten something it shouldn’t have, call your veterinarian or local veterinary emergency clinic immediately. You may also want to call the ASPCA Poison Control Hotline: 1-888-426-4435. Signs of pet distress include: sudden changes in behavior, depression, pain, vomiting, or diarrhea.

 

Travel

Whether you take your pets with you or leave them behind, take these precautions to safeguard them whenever you’re traveling. Learn more about traveling with pets.

  • Interstate and international travel regulations require any pet you bring with you to have a health certificate from your veterinarian – even if you are traveling by carLearn the requirements for any states you will visit or pass through, and schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to get the needed certificate within the timeframes required by those states. Even Santa's reindeer need to get health certificates for their annual flight around the world.
  • Pets in vehicles should always be safely restrained and should never be left alone in the car in any weather. Proper restraint means using a secure harness or a carrier, placed in a location clear of airbags. Never transport your pet in the bed of a truck.
  • If you’re traveling by air and considering bringing your pet with you, talk with your veterinarian first. Air travel can put some pets at risk, especially short-nosed dogs. Your veterinarian is the best person to advise you regarding your own pet’s ability to travel.
  • Pack for your pet as well as yourself if you’re going to travel together. In addition to your pet’s food and medications, this includes bringing copies of their medical records, information to help identify your pet if it becomes lost, first aid supplies, and other items. Refer to our Traveling with Your Pet FAQs for a more complete list. 
  • Boarding your dog while you travel? Talk with your veterinarian to find out how best to protect your pet from canine flu and other contagious diseases, and to make sure your pet is up-to-date on vaccines.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are great travelers! They heartily resist being left behind, so why not take them with you? Whether you are just running up to the grocery store, or taking off for a family vacation, here are some ideas and tips for traveling with your Cavalier.

Tips for Car & Airline Travel

Traveling with your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel can be fun and easy, but a few practical considerations apply, especially if your Cavalier is still a puppy. 
 

Car Travel with your Cavalier

The Cavalier like most dogs, love to ride in the car. But his first inclination was to stand in my lap as I was driving with his paws up on the window ledge so he could see the world go by. 
Needless to say, that position was neither the most comfortable for me or the safest way for Bentley to enjoy a ride in the car.  


The solution  is to put a booster seat in the back . The model we chose was high enough to allow your cavaie to watch the world go by without standing up against the car window.  Now, I can give my driving my full attention and I no longer worry about my cavie riding in the front seat where he/she could potentially be injured if the air bags deployed.

The seat belt fits into the slots in the booster seat to hold it securely in place. It also comes with a strap that can be attached to the seat belt to restrain your pet, if necessary. There's a handy drawer in the base of the booster seat - a great place to keep treats, a bottle of water, an extra leash, or other travel essentials.

Driver's Ed: Tips for Pet Travels:

  • Let new pets become accustomed to the car gradually. Start by putting your Cavalier Spaniel in the car with the motor off. Let him wander around and get familiar with all those "car smells."  Next time, let your pet get used to being in the car with the motor running. Work up slowly to actually driving down with street with your Cavalier by your side.

  • Always keep your dog's collar and ID tags on him when riding in the car.  Particularly until you've fully trained your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel on how to behave in the car, there's always a chance you might be separated in an unfamiliar neighborhood.  

  • Pack a "Pet Emergency Travel Kit". Include a bottle of water,perhaps a water dish, some treats (in case your dog gets loose, you may need to lure him back to the car), and an extra leash.

  • Never leave your best friend in a parked car! Even with the windows slightly open, it's amazing how quickly a parked car can heat up to the point where it can be fatal to a small dog.

  • On long trips, try not to feed your pet for several hours before traveling to avoid upset stomaches. Bring ice cubes to quench your pet's thirst. Consider adding sun shades to your car windows to keep your dog cool and comfortable while traveling. Bring a copy of your pet's Health Record in case you need to seek veterinary assistance out of town. Consider adding a temporary ID tag to your pet's collar with the phone number where you can be reached at your destination.

Airline Travel 

Naturally, you'll need to research the particular regulations and fees imposed by your chosen airline:


Here are also some general guidelines for air travel.

  • Your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel will need to be at least 8 weeks old and weaned before travelling by air.

  • A health certificate is generally required from a licensed veterinarian within 10 days of travel. So, if your vacation will last more than 10 days, you may need to arrange for another vet exam prior to your return.

  • Taking your Cavalier on board and stowing him under the seat in front of you in the main cabin is the only acceptable arrangement. We don'trecommend allowing your pet to be put in the plane's cargo hold as it has been reported that thousands of animals have been lost, injured or killed while being transported in the cargo holds of commercial airlines. So take whatever time and effort is necessary to ensure that your pet's crate or soft-sided carrier will meet the airlines requirements and will fit under the seat.

  • Request a middle seat for yourself as aisle and window seats have less room under the seats.

  • If at all possible, take a direct flight to your destination. This will minimize the time your pet is restrained in his crate or carrier and avoids possible trouble caused by missed connections.

  • Make sure your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is wearing his ID tags. Consider adding a temporary tag to his collar with a phone number where you can be reached at your destination. Write your name, home address and phone number on his crate or carrier as well as your destination and how you can be contacted there.  Carry a photograph of your pet in case your pet gets loose and becomes lost while traveling.

  • If possible, introduce your pet to air travel gradually. Start out by taking short, direct flights. If your Cavalier tolerates the experience well, then considering booking longer flights and eventually, connecting flights. 

  • Don't sedate your pet without the guidance of your veterinarian.

As of June 15, 2005, the new Safe Air Transport for Animals Act in the United States will require US commerical airlines to report incidents of pets lost, injured or killed while flying in the cargo hold.  As a result of these new regulations, in the future, we will be able to check the airline's track record on transporting pets by air. In the meantime, take every precaution to ensure your pet arrives at your destination safely.
 

Need an appointment?

To make an appointment or to receive more information, please call 239-673-9135 or send us an email at:

 

val@cavaliers-by-val.com

 

val1949@yahoo.com  

Please note.  Cavaliers by Val reserves the right to cancel or terminate at our sole discretion the adoption of any Cavalier from our kennel.  

PLEASE BEAR IN MIND, THESE ARE LIVING, BREATHING LITTLE CREATURES WHO NEED TO GO TO THEIR FOREVER HOMES AT 10 WEEKS OF AGE OR SHORTLY THEREAFTER.  A VISIT FOR A PUPPY IN ANY GIVEN LITTER MUST HAVE A DEPOSIT IN PLACE BEFORE WE SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT WITH YOU.  WITHOUT A DEPOSIT, A PUPPY CANNOT BE RESERVED UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES.   WE CARE FOR THESE BABIES DEEPLY AND WANT VERY MUCH FOR THESE LITTLE TREASURES TO GO TO THEIR FOREVER HOME, THEY DESERVE GREAT HAPPINESS AND YOU DESERVE THEIR UNQUESTIONING LOVE.  MAKE CERTAIN YOU WANT A PARTICULAR PUPPY BEFORE YOU PLACE A DEPOSIT.  DEPOSITS MADE ON AN UNBORN LITTER IS REFUNDABLE. ONCE A PUPPY IS BORN AND YOU HAVE PLACED A DEPOSIT, THAT PUPPY IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE TO ANYONE ELSE TO PLACE A DEPOSIT ON. FAMILIES ARE SCHEDULED TO VISIT AND FINALIZE THEIR CHOICE OF PUPPIES AT SIX WEEKS OF AGE ON A FRIDAY OR SATURDAY.  WE SCHEDULE VETERINARIAN AND SPECIALIST APPOINTMENTS THE REST OF THE WEEK.   YOUR VISIT TAKES PLACE IN ORDER OF DEPOSITS SUBMITTED AND  RESERVES THAT PUPPY FOR YOU AND ONLY YOU.  SHOULD YOU CHANGE YOUR MIND AFTER 24 HOURS OF MAKING YOUR CHOICE, YOUR DEPOSIT IS NO LONGER REFUNDABLE.  PLEASE BE CERTAIN OF THE COLOR AND GENDER YOU DESIRE, DO NOT 'SETTLE', THAT IS IMPORTANT.  DON'T REGRET YOUR DECISION.   

IF A PUPPY IS AVAILABLE  AFTER 10 WEEKS OF AGE A DEPOSIT MAY BE PLACED AND IS REFUNDABLE UNTIL YOU'RE ABLE TO VISIT IN PERSON, SHOULD YOU DECIDE NOT TO ADOPT THE PUPPY THEN YOUR DEPOSIT IS REFUNDABLE.  

 

CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES ARE NOT ABLE TO BE COVERED UNDER THESE GUIDELINES, BUT CAN BE WORKED OUT VIA TELEPHONE/EMAIL AS AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN YOUR FAMILY AND OUR KENNEL.

FANTOM VAL'S CHARMING TREVOR

After you have made a selection of your puppy, comes the inevitable 'we can't wait to get our new puppy home', and for you as the new 'parents', it may seem like forever!!  But still this is a very important time for you and your new family member.  Come and visit them, let your new 'fur baby' get used to your voice, your scent, your touch.  We want to accomodate you as much as possible, but with feeding, bathing, grooming and taking our Cavaliers to the vet, we have to ask that you try if at all possible to schedule your visit on FRIDAY or SATURDAY between 11am and 4pm, allowing you time to start to develop a bond with your new little one.  If that is not a possibility due to work/life schedules, we will attempt to accomodate a different day, these bonding visits are very important to the puppy's comfort level with you, making their transition to you and your family so much easier.  We'll have an area set up in our living room with more than ample room to let them wander around and stretch their little legs and for you to play with and handle your new family member.